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These are currently the 10 largest solar power plants in the world

There’s no doubt about it. Solar is among the fastest growing clean energies worldwide. In fact, the number of cities being powered by this energy source keeps rising, as the amount of implemented solar projects also increases. Solar power plants are one the biggest bets across many countries. But who are the leading developers of these large scale stations? Check out our list of the 10 biggest operational ‘solar farms’.

Topaz solar farm

Situated on the Carrizo Plain, in California, this plant was developed by First Solar and is equipped with nine million solar modules. It has a capacity of 550MW and provides electricity to about 180,000 households.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Kamuthi Solar Facility

Completed in september of 2016, this facility comprises nearly 6,000 kilometres of cables, 576 inverters and 154 transformers, all of which generate a capacity of 648 MW. The power plant, located in Tamil Nadu, India, also covers an area of 10 square kilometres and supplies enough energy for 750,000 people. It is India’s biggest solar power station.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: The Financial Express

Villanueva Solar Power Plant

Mexico’s Villanueva Solar Power Plant has an operational capacity of 828MW, which represents an extension to the station’s original 745MW tabbing. The project was an investment of the Enel Group and it’s the company’s biggest power plant worldwide.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: NS Energy Business

Longyangxia Dam Solar Park

One of China’s largest energy generators, the Longyangxia Dam Solar Park is installed in the Qinghai province and spreads over more than 25 square kilometres. It consists of four million solar panels and it has a capacity of 850 MW, while also generating 220-gigawatt hours of electricity per year - enough energy to power 200,000 households.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: Engadget

Kurnool Solar Park

This 1,000MW solar park is operational in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, more specifically in the Kurnool district. Spread over almost 23 square kilometres, the power plant is known for generating more than eight million kWh of electricity on a sunny day.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: Wikipedia

Datong Solar Project

Part of China’s National Energy Administration plans to build solar projects in Datong City, province of Shanxi, the Datong Solar Project is planned to produce 3,2 billion kilowatt-hours of solar energy in 25 years. This huge solar farm has the shape of a giant panda.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: VCG/VCG

Tengger solar park

Known as the “Great Wall of Solar”, the Tengger Solar Park covers 1,200 kilometers of the Tengger desert and supplies clean energy to more than 600,000 houses. With a capacity of 1547MW, it is located in Zhongwei, Ningxia, in China.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: NASA Earth Observatory

Pavagada solar park

This solar project in Karnataka, in Tumakuru, India, has a capacity of 2,000MW and can produce enough electricity to power 700,000 households. After all, it spreads over almost 53 square kilometres through five villages.

Topaz Power Plant

Créditos: Wikimedia Commons

Ouarzazate Solar Power Station

Also called ‘Noor Power Station’, the Ouarzazate Solar Power Station is located on the Sahara Desert and has a 580MW capacity. This power plant is estimated to supply energy to one million people.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: Environmental Justice Atlas

Bhadla Solar Park

Spread over 45 square kilometers, the Bhadla Solar Park, situated in the Rajasthan Jodhpur district, India, is able to produce over 2,250MW of electricity.

Topaz Power Plant

Credits: Mercom India

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